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  7. Epic Games still drags Google to court

Epic Games still drags Google to court



Epic Games still drags Google to court


New episode of the diatribe Epic-Google. This time the Fortnite developer has brought the tech giant in the presence of the Federal Court of Australia. The accusation is that of having a “quasi-monopoly” on the distribution of apps and payments in the Android market, imposing a series of “contractual and technical” refunds on the developers with whom it collaborates. According to Epic, these regulations that the giant imposes on its partners would represent a violation of competition laws in Australia.

“Google gives the illusion of being open by arguing about the presence of alternative App Stores on its platform or by allowing direct downloads of apps from third-party vendors,” said Tim Sweeney, CEO of Epic Games. “In reality, these situations are so rare that they barely affect”. And as for the Australian situation, the Fortnite developer is right. Google controls just under half the market share for around 20 million smartphones across the country. And as Epic points out in its statement, about the 90% of the App present on phones are downloaded from the Google Play Store.

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This figure was reported by the Australian authorities themselves some time ago, and has become a cornerstone of the legal battle between Epic and Google. On the other hand, this is only the latest of the battles that the development company is fighting against giants like Apple and Google. In August, the company introduced a direct payment system into Fortnite, to prevent 30% of revenues from ending up in the pockets of the App Store and Google Play Store properties. As you well know, Apple and Google immediately decided to ban Fortnite from their stores. And since that time Epic has done nothing but fight his own battle against the giants who want to monopolize the App sector. This is just another chapter in the Epic-Google saga. But what else should we expect in the future?