Apple deletes the entire catalog of the Withings firm, after Nokia's complaint

A few days ago we informed you of the complaint that the Finnish brand Nokia had been forced to file against Apple for the misuse of a large number of patents without first checking. Apparently, the two companies were in negotiations years ago, but they were unable to reach an agreement that would benefit both parties. The associated patents mainly concern the use of wireless communications, whether WiFi, 3G, 4G, antennas… Nokia was one of the first companies to successfully enter the world of telephony and was one of the kings in the era of international cell phone expansion.

Apple quickly responded to the complaint stating that Nokia was blackmailing Apple in addition to calling it Patent troll, those companies that do not develop technology but profit from the patents of the companies they buywhich is precisely not the case here, since Nokia has invested a lot in R&D over the years it has been on the market.

At the beginning of the year, Nokia bought Withings, a company offering home products and which in recent times has also poked its head into the world of smartwatches in a different way. Initially this French company focused on launching its products only for the Apple ecosystem, but over the years it has expanded to Android. Apple has just eliminated with the stroke of a pen the entire product catalog of the Withings company, now in the hands of Nokia, logically due to the complaint that the Finnish brand filed against the Cupertino-based company, as this It happened when Bose denounced Nokia. Manzana.

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For now, the only thing we know is that this complaint will circulate for many years, both in court and in the mouths of everyone involved, since This could cost Apple a lot of money. It seems that in recent years, Apple has seen how its role in defending its patents has turned against it and it is now the one who must defend itself from using patents without the authorization of a prior economic agreement.

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